The Download: This startup wants to kick-start a molecular electronics revival

This is today’s edition of The Download, our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what’s going on in the world of technology.

This startup wants to kick-start a molecular electronics revival

In 2000, many hoped molecular electronics (using single molecules to create circuits and components) would leapfrog silicon-based circuitry to allow computer chips to keep getting denser and more powerful.

That vision was short-lived. Five years later, flash had cornered the memory market, silicon continued to dominate chip technology, and the well-funded molecular electronics field nearly collapsed. 

Now, the San Diego-based startup Roswell Biotechnologies hopes

This startup wants to kick-start a molecular electronics revival

In 1999, Rice University chemist Jim Tour co-founded Molecular Electronics Corporation, a company that aimed to use single molecules to make a new type of electronic memory. But Tour had even bigger dreams. In a 2000 story in Wired, he foretold a future in which molecular electronics would leapfrog silicon-based circuitry, allowing computer chips to keep getting denser and more powerful. This vision was short-lived: five years later, flash had cornered the memory market, silicon continued to dominate chip technology, and Tour left the molecular electronics business. The once well-funded field nearly collapsed. 

Now, the San Diego-based startup Roswell …

Laptop Software Program Engineering Technology

Such employees are deeply concerned with safety duties and routinely work together with legal and business teams to forestall, detect, examine and report attainable breaches. From net apps and cellular apps to techniques analysis and database design, study to develop the software that everyone wants to use. I/O bandwidth is rated at 1.2 Gbytes/s to and from reminiscence, with help for the VME64 64-bit bus, operating at 50 Mbytes/s. Extensive computational and knowledge administration capabilities will also be required. Physical modeling and visualization computations would be the driving drive behind this computational requirement. Machines able to 40 Mflops or higher …

The Download: Chatbots could one day replace search engines. Here’s why that’s a terrible idea.

This is today’s edition of The Download, our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what’s going on in the world of technology.

Chatbots could one day replace search engines. Here’s why that’s a terrible idea.

Large AI models can simulate natural language with remarkable realism. Trained on hundreds of books and much of the internet, they absorb vast amounts of information.

There’s growing excitement in the tech sector that they might one day replace search engines. In theory we could simply ask a computer a question and it could return a bite-size answer. The trouble

Why using the oceans to suck up CO2 might not be as easy as hoped

The world’s oceans are amazing carbon sponges. They already capture a quarter of human-produced carbon dioxide when surface waters react with the greenhouse gas in the air or marine organisms gobble it up as they grow.

Their effectiveness has prompted growing hopes that we could somehow accelerate those natural processes to boost the amount the oceans draw down, helping to slow climate change.

One idea gaining attention and investments is to add minerals that could lock up carbon dissolved in the oceans.

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But a study last week in …